Bio-diversity

  • Established the first mangrove gene bank with 64 different species of mangroves, among these are endangered species on the IUNC red list
  • Collected mother plants and seeds from endemic endangered orchids species for storage at the Global Seed Vault at Svalbard and rescuing plants by propagation at WIF modern plant development laboratory.
  • Protecting wild elephants and the dugong sea mammal

Research on soil, water, fauna and flora will continue after the initial 3 year period, as well as social intervention to combat poverty as part of an overall sustainable strategy.

Research on soil, water, fauna and flora will continue after the initial 3 year period, as well as social intervention to combat poverty as part of an overall sustainable strategy.

Taking care of bio-diversity is not only to uphold existing flora and fauna, but also to enrich the environment with additional value such as establishing the first mangrove gene bank with 64 species of all types of mangroves and associates. This is of great value for conservation of the rich gene material of mangroves in Myanmar. Some of these plants are on IUCNs list of endangered species. One of these was believed to have been lost in Myanmar with a few left in Indonesia, but was then identified in the park and is now fully protected with more to be planted. The park has also managed to get seeds from the tallest known mangrove tree in the world (in Ecuador), which is 64 meters high. New plants are already in healthy growth.

NYPA

– creation of livelihoods and conservation of bio-diversity

The nypa mangrove palm is the oldest known tree species in the world, over 70 million years old. It has during time adapted to extreme weather by growing its stem vertically in the ground, with the branches above. It can withstand any monster cyclone since the branches are flexible and will rise up again when the cyclone is over. Nypa produces 50% more sugar in its sap than sugar palm. This is a rich resource for production of healthy sweetener with inverted sugar of the highest quality, in addition to being rich in antioxidants.

Nypa sap can also be used for the production of bio fuel. It is a sustainable resource not fully utilized. Myanmar has thousands of Ha with nypa palms which can create valuable income for thousands of people in coastal areas.

Worldview´s pilot project for nypa sap production, as part of our livelihood and bio-diversity strategy, has produced 800 liters of this healthy sweetener in a test.  Laboratory results confirms its high value as a health product as well as a natural sweetener for households, bakeries and industry.

During the next phase, vacuum cookers will be introduced for energy saving of the highest quality. We are planning to start village based units which can provide thousands of livelihoods as well as conserve this valuable mangrove palm for the future. We are seeking partners with access to the global market for securing sustainable production with job creation in coastal villages, to benefit from a 70-million-year-old natural resource in adaptation to climate change.